UK Government Refuses to Call off Whitehaven Coal Mine Plans
Whitehaven CoalBBC

UK Government Refuses to Call off Whitehaven Coal Mine Plans

People concerned about the climate are dismayed at the decision not to block Whitehaven coking coal mine in Cumbria County in UK. UK’s prime minister

People concerned about the climate are dismayed at the decision not to block Whitehaven coking coal mine in Cumbria County in UK. UK’s prime minister has made several recent speeches expressing his determination to shift away from fossil fuels to protect the planet, and this decision points in the opposite direction. More than 2,300 people objected to the plan along with campaigners including Friends of the Earth, Keep Cumbrian Coal in the Hole and the World Wide Fund for Nature. Friends of the Earth spokesman Mr Tony Bosworth said the refusal to call in the decision was climate wrecking. He said "Allowing coal to be extracted from this proposed mine for over a quarter of a century completely undermines the government's credibility on the climate crisis. Global leadership on the climate emergency means leaving coal in the ground, where it belongs."

Citing environmental concerns, former Liberal Democrats leader & Westmorland & Lonsdale MP Mr Tim Farron said the decision is a complete disaster for our children's future and an almighty backwards step in the fight against climate change.

Cumbria County Council approved the GBP 165 million West Cumbria Mining plan in Whitehaven in October 2020, first underground coal mine in 30 years. The mine would extract coking coal from beneath the Irish Sea.

Wikipedia - In June 2014, West Cumbria Mining announced its intention to invest GBP 14.7 million in a venture to explore for premium quality coking coal underneath the sea off Whitehaven. The project had started before as a plan to find and gasify the coal for energy use, but when the quality of the coal was discovered, it precipitated a shift into mining the coal for steelmaking. The inferred resources suggest that the mine could produce over 3,000,000 tonnes of coal per year from across a 77 square mile section underneath the Irish Sea.

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