Reusing Reclaimed Precast Concrete Elements in New Buildings
Reusing ConcreteTampere University

Reusing Reclaimed Precast Concrete Elements in New Buildings

Concrete is widely used as a construction material, but it has a substantial environmental impact. When a building is demolished, what happens to all the


Concrete is widely used as a construction material, but it has a substantial environmental impact. When a building is demolished, what happens to all the concrete? Tampere University, Finland, is coordinating the new international ReCreate project, which aims to discover how used concrete elements can be deconstructed without damaging them and reused in new buildings and to turn the process into a profitable business. The four-year project has received EUR 12.5 million of funding under the EU’s Horizon 2020 programme.

The recently launched international ReCreate project (2021–2025) coordinated by Tampere University seeks to find new uses for the concrete elements of condemned buildings in the construction of new buildings. The four-year project has received funding under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 call, and it seeks solutions for reusing construction and demolition waste. The project has an overall budget of EUR 12.5 million. The project involves universities and regional company clusters in four countries: Finland, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Germany. The communications partner is the Croatia Green Building Council. All the country clusters will carry out their own pilot projects where they deconstruct precast concrete elements intact and reuse them in a new building.

Researchers at the Faculty of Built Environment have been carrying out ground-breaking research into the circular economy in the construction sector for a decade. In addition, long-term research on renovation and the lifecycle engineering of structures provides a solid foundation for the development of quality assurance procedures that will ensure the safety and integrity of the reused elements. This time, the researchers are set to explore not only the technical implementation of the solutions but also the business perspective.

Tampere University researchers will also bring to the project their specialist expertise in circular economy business models, building regulations and law, and occupational sociology. The Finnish country cluster comprises Tampere University, the construction company Skanska, the demolition company Umacon, the precast concrete company Consolis Parma, the engineering and consultancy company Ramboll, the architecture firm Liike Oy Arkkitehtistudio and the City of Tampere.

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