Thyssenkrupp
Thyssenkrupp

IG Metall Urges Swift Consent for thyssenkrupp Green Steel Plant

IG Metall, the influential labor union, is leaving no stone unturned in its pursuit of swift government commitment for the construction of a climate-friendly

IG Metall, the influential labor union, is leaving no stone unturned in its pursuit of swift government commitment for the construction of a climate-friendly steelmaking plant at thyssenkrupp in Duisburg. The chairman of the central works council of thyssenkrupp Steel Europe, Tekin Nasikkol, expressed concern over the delay in receiving the final demand notice from the German government. The union emphasizes that more than 27,000 colleagues are anxious and that bureaucratic obstacles between Berlin and Brussels must not hinder the transition to green steel production.

Thyssenkrupp, Germany's largest steelmaker, has set its sights on launching the hydrogen-capable large-scale ironmaking plant by the end of 2026. Initially, the plant will operate using natural gas, gradually transitioning to an increasing amount of hydrogen by the end of 2027. The ambitious project to produce green steel is expected to cost well over two billion euros.

While the state and federal governments have allocated around two billion euros for the project, the approval of the EU Commission is still pending. In a recent open letter to German Economics Minister Robert Habeck, prominent representatives from Thyssenkrupp urged the prompt approval of the promised funding.

To intensify their efforts, IG Metall is organizing a day of action on June 14, with thousands of employees gathering in front of the steel division's headquarters in Duisburg. Minister Habeck has been invited to attend, with the expectation that he will deliver a positive decision. Tekin Nasikkol, the chairman of the central works council, emphasized the urgency of the situation and the impact it has on thousands of jobs covered by collective agreements.

Minister Habeck, along with his counterpart from North Rhine-Westphalia, Mona Neubaur, recently visited the site to engage in discussions with the management board and employee representatives. Habeck affirmed his commitment to support the project and assured that he would work closely with the European Commission to make the necessary funding possible.

IG Metall executive Jürgen Kerner, who is also the deputy chairman of the supervisory board of thyssenkrupp AG, acknowledged Minister Habeck's willingness to assist. However, he stressed that it is the responsibility of federal ministers to secure demands from Brussels. With time running out, the fate of thousands of secure jobs covered by collective agreements hangs in the balance. The success of the green steel project relies on swift action and collaboration between all stakeholders involved.

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