Metal Prism Found in Remote Desert of Southern Utah Disappears
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Metal Prism Found in Remote Desert of Southern Utah Disappears

While surveying remote areas of Southern Utah for bighorn sheep, a biologist aboard a Utah Department of Public Safety helicopter assisting the Utah

While surveying remote areas of Southern Utah for bighorn sheep, a biologist aboard a Utah Department of Public Safety helicopter assisting the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources spotted a strange metallic object rising up from out of the sandstone on November 18. The object is seemingly stainless steel prism 9.5 feet tall and planted firmly into the ground. Each panel is about 23 inches wide. There’s no telling how long the object has been there. A battery of experts has rushed to the area to have a closer look at the object and an investigation has been launched to find out for how long the structure has been there, who might have created it and whether to remove it or not. But, the Utah division of the Bureau of Land Management said that it received credible reports that the monolith was removed on the evening of November 27, 2020 by an unknown party. All that was left was a triangular metal piece that used to be on top.

It's clear that it took some planning and work to construct the monolith and embed it in the rock. Authorities are not revealing the location of the structure, as it is so remote that official’s fear that some people may get lost or stranded trying to find it and need to be rescued. But within hours of their announcement, the public found it on Google Earth. The monolith is not present in the Google Earth satellite images of the area from August 2015, but it does appear in Google Earth satellite images from October 2016 onwards.

The object is compared to works by artist John McCracken, who died in 2011, and who lived in the southwest desert, believed in the existence of extra terrestrials, and expressed an interest in leaving behind a piece of artwork in the desert. The object resembled the metallic monoliths McCracken made, and is described as nearly identical to McCracken's Fair 2011 by New York gallery owner David Zwirner, who displays the work. Zwirner subsequently retracted this statement, saying that it was more likely another artist instead paying homage to McCracken. It was also suggested that the monolith was the work of Petecia Le Fawnhawk, who has installed sculptures in desert locations and lived in Utah, but she said that it was not her work.

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